Own a custom electric guitar reimagined by syndicated cartoonist/artist Tony Cochran.


The guitars' looks, feel, tones, and stories compliment a musician, band, or guitar/art collection.

The Guitar Hunter chronicles his journeys here. Check back often.

1st July 2014

Photo

Tony Cochran Guitars Sale
More guitars posting throughout July!
25% off SALE! http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/guitars-for-sale.htm

Tony Cochran Guitars Sale

More guitars posting throughout July!

25% off SALE! http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/guitars-for-sale.htm

Tagged: tony cochransaleartelecrric guitarguitarartistmusicguitar for saleeccentricsteampunkdieselpunkpunkindustrialpunk

Source: facebook.com

19th May 2014

Photo with 14 notes

Mercy Bass Guitar

By Tony Cochran Guitars

Some have told me this electric guitar is not the infamous “Mercy Bass.” I beg to differ. The Mercy Bass supposedly began life as a P-Bass. This one has the right shape. The Mercy was abandoned as unclaimed mail at the Pontotoc Post Office in Pontotoc, Mississippi. I bought this in Algoma, which isn’t far from there. The Mercy got its name from an old Blues group consisting of a drummer, a lead guitar player, and a guy named Erson “Skunkbutt” Flowers who screamed “Mercy” in a guttural, but lyrical, way to announce every song change. He narrowly missed dying one night when a shotgun blast hit his bass instead of his upper intestinal area. He threw the gutshot guitar at the shooter and ran. The attacker received a concussion from the impact and never regained his memory or any functional socialization skills. He was institutionalized and monkeyed around with this bass in the shop for the rest of his days, repairing it with odd bits he found around the Roberson Home for the Criminally Insane. I think this is the Mercy Bass. 

See more pics & LIKE at: www.Facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars.

Mercy Bass Guitar

By Tony Cochran Guitars

Some have told me this electric guitar is not the infamous “Mercy Bass.” I beg to differ. The Mercy Bass supposedly began life as a P-Bass. This one has the right shape. The Mercy was abandoned as unclaimed mail at the Pontotoc Post Office in Pontotoc, Mississippi. I bought this in Algoma, which isn’t far from there. The Mercy got its name from an old Blues group consisting of a drummer, a lead guitar player, and a guy named Erson “Skunkbutt” Flowers who screamed “Mercy” in a guttural, but lyrical, way to announce every song change. He narrowly missed dying one night when a shotgun blast hit his bass instead of his upper intestinal area. He threw the gutshot guitar at the shooter and ran. The attacker received a concussion from the impact and never regained his memory or any functional socialization skills. He was institutionalized and monkeyed around with this bass in the shop for the rest of his days, repairing it with odd bits he found around the Roberson Home for the Criminally Insane. I think this is the Mercy Bass.

See more pics & LIKE at: www.Facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars.

Tagged: tony cochranguitarelectric guitarmusicartart guitarstoryeccentricsteampunkpunkrockdieselpunkguitar for salesalebandsCustom Guitars

Source: facebook.com

2nd January 2014

Photo with 147 notes

Vilma Electric Guitar
by Tony Cochran Guitars
An unlikely event, this electric guitar was found in a chained metal locker. It was beneath the foundation of a K-Mart being torn down on Bethel Rd. in Columbus, Ohio. Even more unlikely, it had been fitted with the only known Vilma tone plate ever seen outside of photographs. Fitted snuggly between the neck and bridge pickups, a Vilma tone plate is rumored to Deandrisize all fractile sounds an infinite number of times. This results in a kind of “sonic resting” or, in other words, the mellowing of supposedly silent spaces between sound waves. I didn’t believe it either, but it sure sounds like it works to me. Does anyone know if that’s a dragon or a sea serpent around the tone controls? It would really help me to date it. - See more at: http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/vilma-electric-guitar.html

Vilma Electric Guitar

by Tony Cochran Guitars

An unlikely event, this electric guitar was found in a chained metal locker. It was beneath the foundation of a K-Mart being torn down on Bethel Rd. in Columbus, Ohio. Even more unlikely, it had been fitted with the only known Vilma tone plate ever seen outside of photographs. Fitted snuggly between the neck and bridge pickups, a Vilma tone plate is rumored to Deandrisize all fractile sounds an infinite number of times. This results in a kind of “sonic resting” or, in other words, the mellowing of supposedly silent spaces between sound waves. I didn’t believe it either, but it sure sounds like it works to me. Does anyone know if that’s a dragon or a sea serpent around the tone controls? It would really help me to date it. - See more at: http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/vilma-electric-guitar.html

Tagged: electric guitartony cochranguitarart guitarsteampunkdieselpunkartstoryeccentricwild guitarsguitar for salesalepunkjunkpunk

Source: facebook.com

8th October 2013

Photo with 13 notes

                                      Inhibitor Electric Guitar
                                     by Tony Cochran Guitars
The Inhibitor electric guitar is the ultimate example of a truly crazy man’s musical instrument. Crazy is such a politically incorrect term these days, as is nuts, bonkers, looney, and a brick shy of a full load of normal. All could apply to Junior Hoskins, of West Haywood, TN. Junior was arguably the most gifted guitar player that ever lived and if he could have successfully shut off the sounds in his head, that he claimed clamored continuously, he may still be remembered with today’s greatest guitar virtuosos. Instead he rapidly chased sanity down a worm hole of no return. Every week he would add “brain fixers” to his well worn axe in an attempt to quiet what he described as “How mice would sing with no heads.” What? Early attempts, remaining on the guitar, include the Wirl-A-Way with clear Reverse chamber, a number 22-6N7G Bell Toner with Vend light, an Electra 21.83MEG that’s externally wired, and a bridge magazine that is registering “Empty” right now. The Inhibitor was installed in late summer 1971. He had mixed results, but did manage to write one more cool song which turned out to be “Out of Limits” played backwards. A good woman, and even better meds, eventually solved a lot of his problems, but they also made him abandon guitar for leather tooling. He was lousy at leather tooling. - See more at: www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

                                      Inhibitor Electric Guitar

                                     by Tony Cochran Guitars

The Inhibitor electric guitar is the ultimate example of a truly crazy man’s musical instrument. Crazy is such a politically incorrect term these days, as is nuts, bonkers, looney, and a brick shy of a full load of normal. All could apply to Junior Hoskins, of West Haywood, TN. Junior was arguably the most gifted guitar player that ever lived and if he could have successfully shut off the sounds in his head, that he claimed clamored continuously, he may still be remembered with today’s greatest guitar virtuosos. Instead he rapidly chased sanity down a worm hole of no return. Every week he would add “brain fixers” to his well worn axe in an attempt to quiet what he described as “How mice would sing with no heads.” What? Early attempts, remaining on the guitar, include the Wirl-A-Way with clear Reverse chamber, a number 22-6N7G Bell Toner with Vend light, an Electra 21.83MEG that’s externally wired, and a bridge magazine that is registering “Empty” right now. The Inhibitor was installed in late summer 1971. He had mixed results, but did manage to write one more cool song which turned out to be “Out of Limits” played backwards. A good woman, and even better meds, eventually solved a lot of his problems, but they also made him abandon guitar for leather tooling. He was lousy at leather tooling. - See more at: www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

Tagged: tony cochranguitar for saleguitareccentricart guitarartstorysteampunkdieselpunkpunkindustrialpunkelectric guitarsale

Source: facebook.com

29th July 2013

Photo with 36 notes

LightHouse  guitar
by Tony Cochran Guitars



Detail pics at: http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/lighthouse-guitar.html 

This electric guitar was found in the crawl space of a long defunct bordello in New Orleans that carried the same name. It is so flashy it could be mistaken for a 15th century religious artifact. Rumor is it belonged to Geoff Diedraugh, a purveyor of the “Creole Crush”, a wicked version of the blues. The “Creole Crush” was outlawed for “all public performance or as payment in kind”. No one knows what that means, but that’s how it’s still worded in municipal code. Geoff was a scofflaw who played it anyway and his rendition of “Sadie’s Gotta Hammer” got him arrested. He died in prison before he ever got a chance to retrieve the LightHouse guitar for an encore. You should see the weird photo that was in the case with it. Goes with the guitar if you want to see it.

 

LightHouse  guitar

by Tony Cochran Guitars

Detail pics at: http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/lighthouse-guitar.html

This electric guitar was found in the crawl space of a long defunct bordello in New Orleans that carried the same name. It is so flashy it could be mistaken for a 15th century religious artifact. Rumor is it belonged to Geoff Diedraugh, a purveyor of the “Creole Crush”, a wicked version of the blues. The “Creole Crush” was outlawed for “all public performance or as payment in kind”. No one knows what that means, but that’s how it’s still worded in municipal code. Geoff was a scofflaw who played it anyway and his rendition of “Sadie’s Gotta Hammer” got him arrested. He died in prison before he ever got a chance to retrieve the LightHouse guitar for an encore. You should see the weird photo that was in the case with it. Goes with the guitar if you want to see it.

 

Tagged: tony cochranguitarguitar for salesaleartLightHousestoryCustom Guitareccentric guitarsteampunkdieselpunkmusic

Source: tonycochranguitars.com

14th May 2013

Photo with 32 notes

IonoGlobe electric guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars

 

The most unique feature of this electric guitar is the fully wired metal ball right by the neck. Farber Endison played this guitar in the late 50’s for a band called The Bubble Tops. Their specialty was car oriented Rock-a-billy music before anyone wanted to hear it. When Farber’s Uncle, Gropper T. Endison, was on safari in what is now known as Namibia, he had nearly been hit by a baseball size metal ball that fell from he sky. (This stuff still happens there. Google it.) He gave it to Farber claiming he could no longer bear the noises it made in his head. Farber’s brother, Clayton, a hypothetical electrical genius, wired it to the guitar and told Farber that it would enhance the almost inaudible, and probably imagined, sounds emanating from the orb. It was probably not true. What we do know is that soon after, Farber grew out his hair, quit wearing shoes, and would only play the guitar in a cave found in the mountains behind his parents’ house. He was found dead in 1965, deep in the cave with the guitar in his lap. There was a partially eaten sandwich and the diagram for five never before heard chords. To this day Clayton will not release them to the public.

IonoGlobe electric guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars

 

The most unique feature of this electric guitar is the fully wired metal ball right by the neck. Farber Endison played this guitar in the late 50’s for a band called The Bubble Tops. Their specialty was car oriented Rock-a-billy music before anyone wanted to hear it. When Farber’s Uncle, Gropper T. Endison, was on safari in what is now known as Namibia, he had nearly been hit by a baseball size metal ball that fell from he sky. (This stuff still happens there. Google it.) He gave it to Farber claiming he could no longer bear the noises it made in his head. Farber’s brother, Clayton, a hypothetical electrical genius, wired it to the guitar and told Farber that it would enhance the almost inaudible, and probably imagined, sounds emanating from the orb. It was probably not true. What we do know is that soon after, Farber grew out his hair, quit wearing shoes, and would only play the guitar in a cave found in the mountains behind his parents’ house. He was found dead in 1965, deep in the cave with the guitar in his lap. There was a partially eaten sandwich and the diagram for five never before heard chords. To this day Clayton will not release them to the public.

Tagged: tony cochranelecrric guitarsteampunkIonoGlobeartart guitarcustomCustom Guitarguitar for salesalemusicstorydieselpunkjunkpunkcool guitareccentric guitarguitarrecycle

Source: TonyCochranGuitars.com

7th April 2013

Photo with 20 notes

OSScaster Electric Guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars
This is the only electric guitar in existence where both an OSS device and a Tone Baker have been electronically mated successfully. Buckle up, guitarionados, this instrument is a rough old relic but its story is almost unbelievable. Osso Bucca was an immigrant who came to America in the ’60s after being fired by Galanti Guitar in Italy. He brought his knowledge of “radio gain” (that’s how it translates to English) with him to Wyoming. There he met up with Tex Gilders who had been fired by Fender for working on a device of his own, called a “Baker”. It’s not real clear what either of these devices is supposed to do singularly but, supposedly, they do it way better in tandem. The only quote from Gilder and Bucca was a note that said, “It does for tone what an oven does for biscuits”. I agree.

OSScaster Electric Guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars

This is the only electric guitar in existence where both an OSS device and a Tone Baker have been electronically mated successfully. Buckle up, guitarionados, this instrument is a rough old relic but its story is almost unbelievable. Osso Bucca was an immigrant who came to America in the ’60s after being fired by Galanti Guitar in Italy. He brought his knowledge of “radio gain” (that’s how it translates to English) with him to Wyoming. There he met up with Tex Gilders who had been fired by Fender for working on a device of his own, called a “Baker”. It’s not real clear what either of these devices is supposed to do singularly but, supposedly, they do it way better in tandem. The only quote from Gilder and Bucca was a note that said, “It does for tone what an oven does for biscuits”. I agree.

Tagged: tony cochranguitarcustomartOSScasterstoryelectric guitarCustom Guitarsteampunkdieselpunkart guitarguitar for salecool guitarsale

27th November 2012

Photo with 27 notes

Angel 199 - Tony Cochran Guitars
This electric guitar was supposedly purchased in Rio de Janeiro, under odd circumstances, around April or May of 1965. I love it but can’t wait to get rid of it. The guy who bought it said there had been a horrible train wreck down there and the old woman who found it in the aftermath, crated and intact, couldn’t wait to get rid of it either. He sold it to me because HE couldn’t wait to get rid of it. He didn’t have the crate anymore, but said it had a broken seal from a Lithuanian monastery. There is a medallion of St. Michael below the bridge and the number 199 on a tag above the bridge pickup. It’s not clear why. I have no instructions on how to operate the wild circuitry, but it’s pretty. The guitar plays nice, but you don’t want it sitting out if you are by yourself. Play it when other people are with you or you’ll be the next one who can’t wait to get rid of it.

Angel 199 - Tony Cochran Guitars

This electric guitar was supposedly purchased in Rio de Janeiro, under odd circumstances, around April or May of 1965. I love it but can’t wait to get rid of it. The guy who bought it said there had been a horrible train wreck down there and the old woman who found it in the aftermath, crated and intact, couldn’t wait to get rid of it either. He sold it to me because HE couldn’t wait to get rid of it. He didn’t have the crate anymore, but said it had a broken seal from a Lithuanian monastery. There is a medallion of St. Michael below the bridge and the number 199 on a tag above the bridge pickup. It’s not clear why. I have no instructions on how to operate the wild circuitry, but it’s pretty. The guitar plays nice, but you don’t want it sitting out if you are by yourself. Play it when other people are with you or you’ll be the next one who can’t wait to get rid of it.

Tagged: tony cochranguitarelectric guitararteccentricmusiccustomart guitarguitarssale

Source: facebook.com

13th September 2012

Photo with 85 notes

Shondracaster Electric Guitar
Here’s an odd electric guitar. The Spiritualist Heron Trippe built 3 Shondra platters in 1961. He named them after his wife, Shondra. They were designed to channel never before heard music into the physical world. No one was sure if he was scamming or sincere, but he claimed to have met with varying degrees of success. The one fastened to an accordian was destroyed in a bench fire at his workshop. Another is in a museum in Prague, screwed to a microphone. No one knows how it got there. This is the 3rd, attached to an electric guitar fashioned by Trippe in an effort to pick up “freak ghost chords”. Trippe died in 1963 and left no instructions on how to use it. Anyone for freak ghost chords?
Details and pics at 
http://www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

Shondracaster Electric Guitar

Here’s an odd electric guitar. The Spiritualist Heron Trippe built 3 Shondra platters in 1961. He named them after his wife, Shondra. They were designed to channel never before heard music into the physical world. No one was sure if he was scamming or sincere, but he claimed to have met with varying degrees of success. The one fastened to an accordian was destroyed in a bench fire at his workshop. Another is in a museum in Prague, screwed to a microphone. No one knows how it got there. This is the 3rd, attached to an electric guitar fashioned by Trippe in an effort to pick up “freak ghost chords”. Trippe died in 1963 and left no instructions on how to use it. Anyone for freak ghost chords?


Details and pics at

http://www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

Tagged: electric guitarsteampunkmusicarttony cochranstoryeccentricguitarguitars for salesalecustomart guitar

Source: facebook.com

29th May 2012

Photo with 14 notes

This bass guitar was found in the wreckage of a Greyhound bus that ran off the road in 1951. There were only 6 people on the bus … the driver, 2 very deaf women from Huntsville, Alabama, a senator from Maine with his mistress, and a 12 year old off to visit his Grandmother in Tulsa. None checked in a guitar as luggage. There was a hand written note inside the case, on a thin sheet of rice paper. It said, “IT’S NOT MINE”… . Weird.

This bass guitar was found in the wreckage of a Greyhound bus that ran off the road in 1951. There were only 6 people on the bus … the driver, 2 very deaf women from Huntsville, Alabama, a senator from Maine with his mistress, and a 12 year old off to visit his Grandmother in Tulsa. None checked in a guitar as luggage. There was a hand written note inside the case, on a thin sheet of rice paper. It said, “IT’S NOT MINE”… . Weird.

Tagged: tony cochrancustomelectric guitareccentricartstorysteampunkguitarguitar for salesale

Source: facebook.com

10th May 2012

Photo with 7 notes

http://youtu.be/9OghBfVvHLk
Yes Tony Cochran Guitars are awesomely playable! Here’s the Pepperjackcaster with the hammer down in France.
Pried from the cold, gray fingers of Jack “Wild Cat” Thompson. He was found dead and naked at the seedy motel just North of Bakersfield, California in 1958. Master of the dirty Honkey Tonk, he spent his life chasing cheap women and drinking cheaper wine. Rumor has it, the device at the bottom was what he called a “Seductorator”. He said it loosened women’s inhibitions: wouldn’t say where he got it.

http://youtu.be/9OghBfVvHLk

Yes Tony Cochran Guitars are awesomely playable! Here’s the Pepperjackcaster with the hammer down in France.

Pried from the cold, gray fingers of Jack “Wild Cat” Thompson. He was found dead and naked at the seedy motel just North of Bakersfield, California in 1958. Master of the dirty Honkey Tonk, he spent his life chasing cheap women and drinking cheaper wine. Rumor has it, the device at the bottom was what he called a “Seductorator”. He said it loosened women’s inhibitions: wouldn’t say where he got it.

Tagged: tony cochranguitarsvideoPepperjackcasterartmusicstorycustomelectric guitarsaleeccentric

Source: facebook.com

25th April 2012

Photo with 7 notes

Jess Endicott bought this guitar, sight unseen, in a crate at Booth’s Pawn Shop on East Fifth Street in Aurora Heights, Texas. Supposedly it had belonged to Zharahz, a prophet for the Apocolyptic cult known as God’s Chimes. They preached that man was bound by time only because they could not hear the sound of God. They attempted to recreate this tone at their weekly get togethers called “unstickings”. According to a note in the crate, Zharahz had fitted his electric guitar with a device that would unstick him in time, but only to the future, not back. They never head from him again.

Jess Endicott bought this guitar, sight unseen, in a crate at Booth’s Pawn Shop on East Fifth Street in Aurora Heights, Texas. Supposedly it had belonged to Zharahz, a prophet for the Apocolyptic cult known as God’s Chimes. They preached that man was bound by time only because they could not hear the sound of God. They attempted to recreate this tone at their weekly get togethers called “unstickings”. According to a note in the crate, Zharahz had fitted his electric guitar with a device that would unstick him in time, but only to the future, not back. They never head from him again.

Tagged: tony cochranelectric guitarguitarsartmusicstorysteampunkcustomsaleeccentric

Source: facebook.com

21st April 2012

Photo with 5 notes

Guitar’s G string is its most dangerous part:-)Part 4 of 4 - Agnes loses her guitar:-(

Guitar’s G string is its most dangerous part:-)
Part 4 of 4 - Agnes loses her guitar:-(

Tagged: tony cochranartguitarselectric guitarsteampunkAgnescomicsaleguitar

Source: facebook.com

21st April 2012

Photo with 2 notes

I know Jimi Hendrix played the Star Spangled Banner at Woodstock. Agnes only knew it was some patriotic guitar song. (Part 3 of 4)

I know Jimi Hendrix played the Star Spangled Banner at Woodstock. Agnes only knew it was some patriotic guitar song. (Part 3 of 4)

Tagged: tony cochranAgnescomicartguitarssaleelectric guitarsteampunkJimi Hendrix

Source: facebook.com

21st April 2012

Photo with 2 notes

Shades & a bandanna always add attitude to guitar playing.Part 2 of 4 finds Agnes running her scales:-)

Shades & a bandanna always add attitude to guitar playing.
Part 2 of 4 finds Agnes running her scales:-)

Tagged: tony cochranguitarguitarselectric guitarscomiceccentricsteampunkcustomsaleAgnesart

Source: facebook.com