Own a custom electric guitar reimagined by syndicated cartoonist/artist Tony Cochran.


The guitars' looks, feel, tones, and stories compliment a musician, band, or guitar/art collection.

The Guitar Hunter chronicles his journeys here. Check back often.

17th July 2014

Photo with 55 notes

                                   “Synchron” electric guitar
                                     by Tony Cochran Guitars

This electric guitar was sold to me in 1986 from the back of a primer gray 1970 Ford Country Squire station wagon at McCormick Place in Chicago. I had just showed up to tour the NAMM show and this scruffy man with Southern Comfort and peanut butter on his breath was sitting on the open tailgate humming Alice Cooper’s “Sun Arise” to himself. “Gonna’ buy a guitar in there? I gotta guitar right here … fine guitar.” Now keep in mind, when he fished it out of its mildewed duffle bag, it was caked with mud, dirty hand gunk, and cat hair. He said he modified it for brain slaying gain and his big chance had been to sell it to Randy Rhoads in 1982. After months of phone calls and run around, he finally got an appointment with the young guitarist for March 19th. They were to meet up in Leesburg just a few miles from his home in Sumterville. He claimed he heard the explosion as his cab pulled up to the gate. His big chance perished in a fireball. I bought it for the story but, after I cleaned it up, I thought its looks were killer. See more at http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/synchron-guitar.html

                                   “Synchron” electric guitar

                                     by Tony Cochran Guitars

This electric guitar was sold to me in 1986 from the back of a primer gray 1970 Ford Country Squire station wagon at McCormick Place in Chicago. I had just showed up to tour the NAMM show and this scruffy man with Southern Comfort and peanut butter on his breath was sitting on the open tailgate humming Alice Cooper’s “Sun Arise” to himself. “Gonna’ buy a guitar in there? I gotta guitar right here … fine guitar.” Now keep in mind, when he fished it out of its mildewed duffle bag, it was caked with mud, dirty hand gunk, and cat hair. He said he modified it for brain slaying gain and his big chance had been to sell it to Randy Rhoads in 1982. After months of phone calls and run around, he finally got an appointment with the young guitarist for March 19th. They were to meet up in Leesburg just a few miles from his home in Sumterville. He claimed he heard the explosion as his cab pulled up to the gate. His big chance perished in a fireball. I bought it for the story but, after I cleaned it up, I thought its looks were killer. See more at http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/synchron-guitar.html

Tagged: tony cochranelectric guitarguitar for saleguitarmusicartart guitarartiststeampunkdieselpunkpunkindustrialpunkodd guitareccentricCustom Guitar

Source: tonycochranguitars.com

19th May 2014

Photo with 11 notes

Mercy Bass Guitar

By Tony Cochran Guitars

Some have told me this electric guitar is not the infamous “Mercy Bass.” I beg to differ. The Mercy Bass supposedly began life as a P-Bass. This one has the right shape. The Mercy was abandoned as unclaimed mail at the Pontotoc Post Office in Pontotoc, Mississippi. I bought this in Algoma, which isn’t far from there. The Mercy got its name from an old Blues group consisting of a drummer, a lead guitar player, and a guy named Erson “Skunkbutt” Flowers who screamed “Mercy” in a guttural, but lyrical, way to announce every song change. He narrowly missed dying one night when a shotgun blast hit his bass instead of his upper intestinal area. He threw the gutshot guitar at the shooter and ran. The attacker received a concussion from the impact and never regained his memory or any functional socialization skills. He was institutionalized and monkeyed around with this bass in the shop for the rest of his days, repairing it with odd bits he found around the Roberson Home for the Criminally Insane. I think this is the Mercy Bass. 

See more pics & LIKE at: www.Facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars.

Mercy Bass Guitar

By Tony Cochran Guitars

Some have told me this electric guitar is not the infamous “Mercy Bass.” I beg to differ. The Mercy Bass supposedly began life as a P-Bass. This one has the right shape. The Mercy was abandoned as unclaimed mail at the Pontotoc Post Office in Pontotoc, Mississippi. I bought this in Algoma, which isn’t far from there. The Mercy got its name from an old Blues group consisting of a drummer, a lead guitar player, and a guy named Erson “Skunkbutt” Flowers who screamed “Mercy” in a guttural, but lyrical, way to announce every song change. He narrowly missed dying one night when a shotgun blast hit his bass instead of his upper intestinal area. He threw the gutshot guitar at the shooter and ran. The attacker received a concussion from the impact and never regained his memory or any functional socialization skills. He was institutionalized and monkeyed around with this bass in the shop for the rest of his days, repairing it with odd bits he found around the Roberson Home for the Criminally Insane. I think this is the Mercy Bass.

See more pics & LIKE at: www.Facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars.

Tagged: tony cochranguitarelectric guitarmusicartart guitarstoryeccentricsteampunkpunkrockdieselpunkguitar for salesalebandsCustom Guitars

Source: facebook.com

2nd May 2014

Photo with 2 notes

                         Mercy Bass Guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars
Out of the Shadows - Tony Cochran Guitars new Mercy Bass is about to be released and energize you! Which setting do you choose and why?
Answer at www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

                         Mercy Bass Guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars

Out of the Shadows - Tony Cochran Guitars new Mercy Bass is about to be released and energize you! Which setting do you choose and why?

Answer at www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

Tagged: tony cochranguitar for saleguitarmusicbassartelectric guitareccentricart guitarartist

Source: facebook.com

1st May 2014

Photo with 34 notes

                 Strobotac electric guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars
Tony Cochran was checking Plevido levels before shipping the Strobotac guitar to its new master guitarist in New York. http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/strobotac.html

                 Strobotac electric guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars

Tony Cochran was checking Plevido levels before shipping the Strobotac guitar to its new master guitarist in New York. http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/strobotac.html

Tagged: tony cochranguitar for saleguitarelectric guitarartCustom Guitarstorysteampunkmusiceccentricdieselpunkpunkrock

Source: tonycochranguitars.com

16th April 2014

Photo with 17 notes

                        Jynx Electric Guitar by Tony Cochran
This electric guitar is twice jinxed. Andrew “Fish” Cook bought a charred guitar body from a street vendor in Arkesden, Essex in 1994. The seller claimed it had been salvaged from a 1991 house fire where a famous Rock musician perished. The entire right side had been burnt to a crisp, so Andrew fashioned a prosthetic control area using a 1949 Sunbeam hedge trimmer his uncle had given to him in a box of junk. Sometime in 2001, the police came looking for the box because his now deceased uncle had been implicated in a murder cover-up. According to the detective, the unearthed body looked like “it had been hacked up with a weedwacker”. Andrew told him there was nothing in the box that would be helpful, so they left. He thought about the crusty dark bits he had chipped off the trimmer, sold the guitar, and bought a drum set.
LIKE at www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars for new pics & stories.

                        Jynx Electric Guitar by Tony Cochran

This electric guitar is twice jinxed. Andrew “Fish” Cook bought a charred guitar body from a street vendor in Arkesden, Essex in 1994. The seller claimed it had been salvaged from a 1991 house fire where a famous Rock musician perished. The entire right side had been burnt to a crisp, so Andrew fashioned a prosthetic control area using a 1949 Sunbeam hedge trimmer his uncle had given to him in a box of junk. Sometime in 2001, the police came looking for the box because his now deceased uncle had been implicated in a murder cover-up. According to the detective, the unearthed body looked like “it had been hacked up with a weedwacker”. Andrew told him there was nothing in the box that would be helpful, so they left. He thought about the crusty dark bits he had chipped off the trimmer, sold the guitar, and bought a drum set.

LIKE at www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars for new pics & stories.

Tagged: tony cochranguitar for saleguitarmusicsteampunkartcustomeccentricdieselpunkrockstoryart guitarJynxelectric guitarartist

Source: tonycochranguitars.com

2nd January 2014

Photo with 131 notes

Vilma Electric Guitar
by Tony Cochran Guitars
An unlikely event, this electric guitar was found in a chained metal locker. It was beneath the foundation of a K-Mart being torn down on Bethel Rd. in Columbus, Ohio. Even more unlikely, it had been fitted with the only known Vilma tone plate ever seen outside of photographs. Fitted snuggly between the neck and bridge pickups, a Vilma tone plate is rumored to Deandrisize all fractile sounds an infinite number of times. This results in a kind of “sonic resting” or, in other words, the mellowing of supposedly silent spaces between sound waves. I didn’t believe it either, but it sure sounds like it works to me. Does anyone know if that’s a dragon or a sea serpent around the tone controls? It would really help me to date it. - See more at: http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/vilma-electric-guitar.html

Vilma Electric Guitar

by Tony Cochran Guitars

An unlikely event, this electric guitar was found in a chained metal locker. It was beneath the foundation of a K-Mart being torn down on Bethel Rd. in Columbus, Ohio. Even more unlikely, it had been fitted with the only known Vilma tone plate ever seen outside of photographs. Fitted snuggly between the neck and bridge pickups, a Vilma tone plate is rumored to Deandrisize all fractile sounds an infinite number of times. This results in a kind of “sonic resting” or, in other words, the mellowing of supposedly silent spaces between sound waves. I didn’t believe it either, but it sure sounds like it works to me. Does anyone know if that’s a dragon or a sea serpent around the tone controls? It would really help me to date it. - See more at: http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/vilma-electric-guitar.html

Tagged: electric guitartony cochranguitarart guitarsteampunkdieselpunkartstoryeccentricwild guitarsguitar for salesalepunkjunkpunk

Source: facebook.com

25th November 2013

Video with 2 notes

Tony Cochran Guitars -

Boostercaster Guitar Live at The National Guitar Museum


Video of HP Newquist, Executive Director of The National GUITAR Museum, discussing Tony Cochran Guitars and playing the Cochran “Boostercaster” guitar, which is on tour with the museum’s travelling exhibit “GUITAR: The Instrument That Rocked the World.”

Tony Cochran Guitars “Boostercaster” guitar is in The National Guitar Museum. The National GUITAR Museum was founded to promote and preserve the legacy of the guitar. It is the world’s first museum dedicated to the history, evolution, and cultural impact of the guitar.

The NGM launched a Touring Exhibition entitled “GUITAR: The Instrument That Rocked The World” that began with previews outside NYC in February 2011. The national rollout was in Orlando on June 11, 2011. The exhibit is now booked at sites across the country for the next several years. At the completion of the tour, one U.S. city will be chosen to become the permanent home of The National GUITAR Museum.

More at  https://www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

Tagged: videotony cochranBoostercasterguitarelectric guitarmusicmuseumartsteampunkdieselpunkpunkjunkpunkindustrialpunkart guitar

Source: tonycochranguitars.com

8th October 2013

Photo with 12 notes

                                      Inhibitor Electric Guitar
                                     by Tony Cochran Guitars
The Inhibitor electric guitar is the ultimate example of a truly crazy man’s musical instrument. Crazy is such a politically incorrect term these days, as is nuts, bonkers, looney, and a brick shy of a full load of normal. All could apply to Junior Hoskins, of West Haywood, TN. Junior was arguably the most gifted guitar player that ever lived and if he could have successfully shut off the sounds in his head, that he claimed clamored continuously, he may still be remembered with today’s greatest guitar virtuosos. Instead he rapidly chased sanity down a worm hole of no return. Every week he would add “brain fixers” to his well worn axe in an attempt to quiet what he described as “How mice would sing with no heads.” What? Early attempts, remaining on the guitar, include the Wirl-A-Way with clear Reverse chamber, a number 22-6N7G Bell Toner with Vend light, an Electra 21.83MEG that’s externally wired, and a bridge magazine that is registering “Empty” right now. The Inhibitor was installed in late summer 1971. He had mixed results, but did manage to write one more cool song which turned out to be “Out of Limits” played backwards. A good woman, and even better meds, eventually solved a lot of his problems, but they also made him abandon guitar for leather tooling. He was lousy at leather tooling. - See more at: www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

                                      Inhibitor Electric Guitar

                                     by Tony Cochran Guitars

The Inhibitor electric guitar is the ultimate example of a truly crazy man’s musical instrument. Crazy is such a politically incorrect term these days, as is nuts, bonkers, looney, and a brick shy of a full load of normal. All could apply to Junior Hoskins, of West Haywood, TN. Junior was arguably the most gifted guitar player that ever lived and if he could have successfully shut off the sounds in his head, that he claimed clamored continuously, he may still be remembered with today’s greatest guitar virtuosos. Instead he rapidly chased sanity down a worm hole of no return. Every week he would add “brain fixers” to his well worn axe in an attempt to quiet what he described as “How mice would sing with no heads.” What? Early attempts, remaining on the guitar, include the Wirl-A-Way with clear Reverse chamber, a number 22-6N7G Bell Toner with Vend light, an Electra 21.83MEG that’s externally wired, and a bridge magazine that is registering “Empty” right now. The Inhibitor was installed in late summer 1971. He had mixed results, but did manage to write one more cool song which turned out to be “Out of Limits” played backwards. A good woman, and even better meds, eventually solved a lot of his problems, but they also made him abandon guitar for leather tooling. He was lousy at leather tooling. - See more at: www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

Tagged: tony cochranguitar for saleguitareccentricart guitarartstorysteampunkdieselpunkpunkindustrialpunkelectric guitarsale

Source: facebook.com

7th September 2013

Photo with 58 notes

                  Betty Electric Guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars
This electric guitar was named after the owner’s beloved Mother, Betty Severton, a piano teacher in Lima, Ohio. She taught lessons in her 3rd floor walk-up on an old Baldwin Acrosonic spinet piano. When she finally got evicted in 1965, for nonpayment of rent, she hired 3 high school boys to help her move it. They decided to lower it out the window with an old rope and 2 leather belts. Betty, directing from below, was flattened when 1 of the belts slipped and sent 300 pounds of unfettered spinet onto her head. Emotionally as crushed as his Mother was physically, Kyle Severton made most of this guitar out of the bits and pieces of piano he recovered as well as his Mother’s good silver pie server. He wanted her symbolically with him and she loved pie. He went on to play in several now defunct bands trying to fuse Surf Rock with Gospel. He eventually quit to lay brick. - See more:

Like us at http://www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

                  Betty Electric Guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars

This electric guitar was named after the owner’s beloved Mother, Betty Severton, a piano teacher in Lima, Ohio. She taught lessons in her 3rd floor walk-up on an old Baldwin Acrosonic spinet piano. When she finally got evicted in 1965, for nonpayment of rent, she hired 3 high school boys to help her move it. They decided to lower it out the window with an old rope and 2 leather belts. Betty, directing from below, was flattened when 1 of the belts slipped and sent 300 pounds of unfettered spinet onto her head. Emotionally as crushed as his Mother was physically, Kyle Severton made most of this guitar out of the bits and pieces of piano he recovered as well as his Mother’s good silver pie server. He wanted her symbolically with him and she loved pie. He went on to play in several now defunct bands trying to fuse Surf Rock with Gospel. He eventually quit to lay brick. - See more:

Like us at http://www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars

Tagged: tony cochranguitar for saleguitarelectric guitarartart guitarstorysteampunkbettydieselpunkeccentricmusicpunkindustrialpunkartists on tumblr

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26th June 2013

Photo with 124 notes

 Steinlite guitar 
by Tony Cochran Guitars 

                                                                             The Steinlite electric guitar was found in a safe excavated from beneath the foundation of The Radio Building at 823 Kansas Ave. in Atchison, Kansas. It is rumored that Fred Stein, the genius who invented plug-in radio, was hiding it from the prying eyes of Gibson Guitar who wanted to sue him. In many ways similar to Gibson’s Les Paul model, the Steinlite differed with a bolt on neck, louvered sonic channels and also incorporated parts from his famous Grain Moisture Detector. When questioned about why an electric guitar would need moisture detecting abilities, Fred said, slyly, “You have to know when the woman you’re playing to wants you to put down the damn guitar and take care of business.” Fred was quite the kidder. It’s never been apart. I preferred to leave its rusty, crusty, industrial look undisturbed, along with any secrets its guts may spill. I can’t make anything light up on it, but then I don’t play that well.

http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/steinlite.html

 Steinlite guitar

by Tony Cochran Guitars

                                                                             The Steinlite electric guitar was found in a safe excavated from beneath the foundation of The Radio Building at 823 Kansas Ave. in Atchison, Kansas. It is rumored that Fred Stein, the genius who invented plug-in radio, was hiding it from the prying eyes of Gibson Guitar who wanted to sue him. In many ways similar to Gibson’s Les Paul model, the Steinlite differed with a bolt on neck, louvered sonic channels and also incorporated parts from his famous Grain Moisture Detector. When questioned about why an electric guitar would need moisture detecting abilities, Fred said, slyly, “You have to know when the woman you’re playing to wants you to put down the damn guitar and take care of business.” Fred was quite the kidder. It’s never been apart. I preferred to leave its rusty, crusty, industrial look undisturbed, along with any secrets its guts may spill. I can’t make anything light up on it, but then I don’t play that well.

http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/steinlite.html

Tagged: guitarguitar for saleelectric guitarartSteinlitestorysteampunkdieselpunkCustom Guitarmusictony cochranjunkpunkindustrialpunkbandrock n rollpunkrock

Source: tonycochranguitars.com

7th April 2013

Photo with 18 notes

OSScaster Electric Guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars
This is the only electric guitar in existence where both an OSS device and a Tone Baker have been electronically mated successfully. Buckle up, guitarionados, this instrument is a rough old relic but its story is almost unbelievable. Osso Bucca was an immigrant who came to America in the ’60s after being fired by Galanti Guitar in Italy. He brought his knowledge of “radio gain” (that’s how it translates to English) with him to Wyoming. There he met up with Tex Gilders who had been fired by Fender for working on a device of his own, called a “Baker”. It’s not real clear what either of these devices is supposed to do singularly but, supposedly, they do it way better in tandem. The only quote from Gilder and Bucca was a note that said, “It does for tone what an oven does for biscuits”. I agree.

OSScaster Electric Guitar by Tony Cochran Guitars

This is the only electric guitar in existence where both an OSS device and a Tone Baker have been electronically mated successfully. Buckle up, guitarionados, this instrument is a rough old relic but its story is almost unbelievable. Osso Bucca was an immigrant who came to America in the ’60s after being fired by Galanti Guitar in Italy. He brought his knowledge of “radio gain” (that’s how it translates to English) with him to Wyoming. There he met up with Tex Gilders who had been fired by Fender for working on a device of his own, called a “Baker”. It’s not real clear what either of these devices is supposed to do singularly but, supposedly, they do it way better in tandem. The only quote from Gilder and Bucca was a note that said, “It does for tone what an oven does for biscuits”. I agree.

Tagged: tony cochranguitarcustomartOSScasterstoryelectric guitarCustom Guitarsteampunkdieselpunkart guitarguitar for salecool guitarsale

27th November 2012

Photo with 22 notes

Angel 199 - Tony Cochran Guitars
This electric guitar was supposedly purchased in Rio de Janeiro, under odd circumstances, around April or May of 1965. I love it but can’t wait to get rid of it. The guy who bought it said there had been a horrible train wreck down there and the old woman who found it in the aftermath, crated and intact, couldn’t wait to get rid of it either. He sold it to me because HE couldn’t wait to get rid of it. He didn’t have the crate anymore, but said it had a broken seal from a Lithuanian monastery. There is a medallion of St. Michael below the bridge and the number 199 on a tag above the bridge pickup. It’s not clear why. I have no instructions on how to operate the wild circuitry, but it’s pretty. The guitar plays nice, but you don’t want it sitting out if you are by yourself. Play it when other people are with you or you’ll be the next one who can’t wait to get rid of it.

Angel 199 - Tony Cochran Guitars

This electric guitar was supposedly purchased in Rio de Janeiro, under odd circumstances, around April or May of 1965. I love it but can’t wait to get rid of it. The guy who bought it said there had been a horrible train wreck down there and the old woman who found it in the aftermath, crated and intact, couldn’t wait to get rid of it either. He sold it to me because HE couldn’t wait to get rid of it. He didn’t have the crate anymore, but said it had a broken seal from a Lithuanian monastery. There is a medallion of St. Michael below the bridge and the number 199 on a tag above the bridge pickup. It’s not clear why. I have no instructions on how to operate the wild circuitry, but it’s pretty. The guitar plays nice, but you don’t want it sitting out if you are by yourself. Play it when other people are with you or you’ll be the next one who can’t wait to get rid of it.

Tagged: tony cochranguitarelectric guitararteccentricmusiccustomart guitarguitarssale

Source: facebook.com

16th November 2012

Photo with 72 notes

Arkanacaster Guitar 
by Tony Cochran Guitars


This electric guitar was the property of Country Western star Diamond Ted Raymond of Deadtree, Arkansas. He fitted it with what he called “a harmonic deceptor”, a crude, but effective planking system that humanized bent notes. Diamond Ted specialized in a particularly nasty breed of Honky Tonk called Flinch Wailing. After it was outlawed by the state and condemned in the Catholic Telegraph, Diamond Ted went underground with his performances until his death in 1961. He passed out drunk while eating peanut butter with his hands, and squirrels ate his fingers off. He bled to death. Rumor has it … he wanted his guitar buried with him, but his lousy brother stole it from the funeral home. The deceptor doesn’t seem to work anymore, but it’s still a handsome piece.

Arkanacaster Guitar

by Tony Cochran Guitars

This electric guitar was the property of Country Western star Diamond Ted Raymond of Deadtree, Arkansas. He fitted it with what he called “a harmonic deceptor”, a crude, but effective planking system that humanized bent notes. Diamond Ted specialized in a particularly nasty breed of Honky Tonk called Flinch Wailing. After it was outlawed by the state and condemned in the Catholic Telegraph, Diamond Ted went underground with his performances until his death in 1961. He passed out drunk while eating peanut butter with his hands, and squirrels ate his fingers off. He bled to death. Rumor has it … he wanted his guitar buried with him, but his lousy brother stole it from the funeral home. The deceptor doesn’t seem to work anymore, but it’s still a handsome piece.

Tagged: tony cochranArkanacasterguitarscustomartmusicstorysteampunkelectric guitarguitar for saleeccentricart guitarcustom guitar

Source: facebook.com

17th October 2012

Photo with 21 notes

                                           Smashmouth Bass guitarThis electric bass guitar was played by Philip Endicot, who worked for General Radio back in the late 40’s - early 50’s. He scavenged parts there like a fat man in a bologna factory. His real passion was a 5 piece jazz band he belonged to called “Reform School”. This was one of the first jazz groups to go electric in Concord. He would use the pilfered parts on his bass in a quest to find “smashmouth boom”. Caught stealing red handed at G.R. in ‘58, he was sent to jail where he died in a fight over cigarettes, non-filtered Pall Malls to be exact. His brother inherited the bass and stuck it in his attic until 1998 when I bought it at his garage sale. It has the ultra rare contactor, a cool dark tone reed, and the infamous type 740 capacitance test bridge that G.R. was supposedly developing for a guy named Leo in Fullerton. (Never proven.)
LIKE us at www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars   for details & photos link

                                           Smashmouth Bass guitar

This electric bass guitar was played by Philip Endicot, who worked for General Radio back in the late 40’s - early 50’s. He scavenged parts there like a fat man in a bologna factory. His real passion was a 5 piece jazz band he belonged to called “Reform School”. This was one of the first jazz groups to go electric in Concord. He would use the pilfered parts on his bass in a quest to find “smashmouth boom”. Caught stealing red handed at G.R. in ‘58, he was sent to jail where he died in a fight over cigarettes, non-filtered Pall Malls to be exact. His brother inherited the bass and stuck it in his attic until 1998 when I bought it at his garage sale. It has the ultra rare contactor, a cool dark tone reed, and the infamous type 740 capacitance test bridge that G.R. was supposedly developing for a guy named Leo in Fullerton. (Never proven.)

LIKE us at www.facebook.com/TonyCochranGuitars   for details & photos link

Tagged: tony cochranmusicSmashmouthbassguitarguitars for saleelectric guitareccentriccustomsteampunkdieselpunkartart guitar

Source: tonycochranguitars.com

12th October 2012

Photoset

Rick Springfield owns & features his 3 Tony Cochran Guitars on his new CD
                                  Songs For The End Of The World

Rick Springfield has 4 different covers, 3 with Tony Cochran Guitars and 1 with his raygun, for his new CD released October 9, 2012. Credit to Tony Cochran Guitars is on the home page of Rick’s website http://www.rickspringfield.com/s4eow/s4eow.html and inside each CD. The Separatorcaster and Coppercaster electric guitars are on 3 CD covers and the Alumicaster appears in promos. Rick says he is playing the guitars on stage and any TV he does for promo of the new CD. Tony Cochran Guitars loves working with Rick and has always been a great fan of his music. We know Songs For The End Of The World is a great hit! Grab them fast!!!
More pictures of Rick and details / pics for each of the guitars can be found on www.TonyCochranGuitars.com site at the following links:


Separatorcaster:  http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/separatorcaster.html
Coppercaster:  http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/coppercaster.html
Alumicaster:  http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/alumicaster.html

Video of Rick Springfiled playing Tony Cochran Guitars at:

http://www.tonycochranguitars.com/videos.html

Tagged: CDartcustomeccentricelectric guitarmusicrick springfieldsteampunktony cochranvideoelecrric guitar

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